2018 California Wildfires: What We Can Do to Help

Posted on Nov 15, 2018 2:15:49 PM

The 2018 California Wildfires have devastated both the Northern and Southern parts of the state at record breaking impacts for the second year in a row. In Southern California, the Woosley Fire has had the most devastating effect encroaching in highly populated areas in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Ventura specifically was hit hard last year, not only with the fires, but also with a record amount of rainfall that caused even more devastating avalanches and floods displacing many families and lives. The outpour in the community that continues to get ravaged has been tremendous for the local Fire Team for Cal Fire, Ventura County Fire Department, and Los Angeles County Fire Department. The Los Angeles County Fire has urged the community that any public service or donation be referred to their website for contribution or to local charity.

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The community that has been hit the hardest are those in very mountainous and dense populations of Malibu and the surrounding areas. Many of these homes contain a vast amount of animals both at the homes and on farmland. Ventura County has 11 major Animal Evacuation Centers, half of which are at capacity. It is estimated that at least 10,000 more wild animals or pets have been displaced from the Woolsey and Hill Fires, both near the Ventura-Los Angeles County line, and the Camp Fire in rural Butte County, about 500 miles to the north. Los Angeles County Animal Care & Control said that about 700 animals, including 550 horses, nine cows and at least one tortoise, are in their care. In neighboring Ventura County, the public shelters have taken in 56 horses, 30 dogs, 25 cats, seven chickens, six rabbits, four goats and a bird by late Monday morning. Many of these shelters run very thin on supplies needed for care, especially for the larger animals that would normally not be in their care. The OnTrac Southern California Operations team including Ventura General Manager Frank Scordia, Ontario General Manager Michael King, and Regional General Manager Michael Kerper spent the day dropping off pallets of water to the Humane Society of Ventura at the horse boarding location in Ventura near the racetrack, as well as donating towels and blankets to the Ventura County Animal Services for the huge influx of animals needed to keep clean and warm. If you would like to help these organizations, please consider visiting their websites for more information. The Humane Society of Ventura County can be found here: https://www.hsvc.org/. The link to the Ventura County Animal Services is here: http://www.vcas.us/.

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If you would like to help the victims of the 2018 California Wildfires, but don’t know how please consider researching the various causes and charitable organizations first to learn how they can use your help. Some organizations are asking for monetary donations only. If supplies and volunteering is how you’d like to help, there are other organizations who are accepting help that way too. The New York Times has published an online article with multiple organizations who are needing help. Please click this link for more information. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/11/reader-center/california-fires-how-to-help.html.

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Here are some statistics of what Southern California has incurred as of Tuesday afternoon, November 13th, 2018:

Since this fire started on Friday, November 9th, 2018, the three major fires that have impacted Ventura County are the Woosley Fire, Hill Fire, and Peak Fire. The Woosley Fire has burned more than 96,314 acres and is still at only 35% containment. This has caused devastation throughout Ventura County and prompted the evacuation of over 260,000 residents, many of which still have not returned to their homes. The Hill Fire has burned over 4,500 acres and is currently at 90% containment. The Peak Fire was set off yesterday and burned 186 acres before quickly contained by Cal Fire, but prompted a shutdown of the 118 freeway for a brief period of time and caused a lot of concern to the residents of Simi Valley. There are 3592 personnel working the fires with 619 fire trucks continuing to battle the blaze that is increasing with the higher winds thru Tuesday afternoon.

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Topics: Delivering Hope, community involvement, California